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Casserole

Braised Beef Short Ribs with Roasted Cipollini Onions, Robuchon Mashed Potatoes
Braised Beef Short Ribs with Roasted Cipollini Onions, Robuchon Mashed Potatoes

Casserole Recipes

More than four million babies are born in the United States every year. That means there are at least four million casseroles being baked every year to give away as gifts to young families. Add in the number of casseroles baked for sick friends and families, potluck dinners, and easy meals, and you’ve easily toppled the ten million-per-year mark.

Fuzzy math aside, casseroles are like a gift in a dish. It doesn’t matter if the gift is for a loved one or a gift for you, but everyone likes a casserole. They are easy to make, they taste delicious and when prepared with the proper ingredients, a casserole can be good for you too.

Well, here at Gourmetrecipe.com, we like casseroles too. They are more than just comfort food, in our opinion. With a little creativity they can also be elevated to gourmet status.

Gourmet Recipes - Vegetable Casseroles

Speaking of good-for-you, the American Institute for Cancer Research says that in order to make your meals cancer-fighting dynamos, it recommends modifying recipes to include at least two thirds vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans, and one third or less meat.

A number of our vegetable casserole recipes will put you on the healthy path, including the delicious Cabbage Gratin with Polenta, Curried Green Bean and Mushroom Casserole, Romano Bean Casserole with Winter Squash and Mushrooms, Green Tomato Casserole or the Unstuffed Pepper Casserole. These savory recipes combine choice ingredients to offer you a flavorful experience and the comfort in knowing you’re eating healthy.

Additional Casseroles

Sometimes, however, you’ve had the day from you-know-where and all you want to do is eat you-know-what: fat, empty calories and other nutritional garbage. Put down the pint of fattening ice cream and try another healthy casserole recipe with just a smidgen of guilty pleasure mixed in instead. Your hips will thank you later.

We recommend the Cheese-Topped Chicken Tortilla Casserole for the ultimate in comfort food. If you’d like something else, however, perhaps the Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Cheese Sauce will suit your fancy better.

An additional bonus of the most-loved casserole dish is their ability to freeze well. If you plan to freeze the meal for another time, be sure to bake your dish first. Once it is fully cooked, let it cool in the refrigerator until it is cool to the touch, and then transfer it to the freezer.

When reheating, set the oven to the original cooking time and place it in an oven-safe dish for reheating. Casseroles freeze well for about three months. So, if you have a friend nearing her due date, now’s a good time to make one for her and one for you too.

 

 

Casserole-making is probably one of the most ancient forms of cooking, according to FoodTimeline.org. Back when sources for food were limited, the best way to get the most nutrients from food was to stick a bunch of ingredients together in a pot. By slowing cooking those ingredients in an earthenware container, the flavors blended well and tough foods (like game meat) softened. Today, casseroles continue as a workhorse in the kitchen, making delicious meals possible without a lot of work.

Basic Casserole Ingredients


Traditionally, casseroles include at least one each of: a vegetable, a protein (meat, poultry, fish, or beans), a starch (like potatoes, rice, or pasta), a sauce, and a topping. Knowing this basic recipe, anyone can create a casserole from leftovers. For example, if you had pork roast on Monday, you could make a casserole with left over pork roast (cut into bite-sized chunks) on Tuesday. You’d just need to add some vegetables and perhaps a little rice or pasta, along with a sauce and topping.

The Sauce

Every casserole needs a binder – something to bring all the ingredients together. Still using the leftover pork casserole as an example, you could place the juices left over from cooking the meat in a saucepan, add a little wine, water, or stock, if desired, and reduce on the stove. To thicken the sauce, you could add a tablespoon or two of cornstarch or flour. Or, instead of using the pork juice, you could use cream soup, gravy, or chees e sauce as a binder. For other types of casseroles, a mixture of eggs and ricotta cheese is a good choice.

Toppin gs

Most casseroles have some sort of starch topping, like thinly sliced potatoes, mashed potatoes, crackers, or bread crumbs. A mixture of cheeses sprinkled over the top of the casserole is also appropriate.

Putting it Together

Ingredients that take a while to cook through (like chunks of meat or large pieces of onion) are at least partially pre-cooked before putting them in the casserole. Once this is done, all the basic ingredients can go into a casserole dish. Whether you choose to mix the main ingredients together in the dish or layer them is a matter of personal preference. Add the sauce, then the topping, and bake in a 350 to 375 degree F. oven until the ingredients are heated through. If desired, casseroles are easy to freeze. Just line the casserole dish with heavy duty foil before adding the ingredients; allow the casserole to cool, then place it (still in the dish) in the freezer. Once the casserole is frozen, remove it from the dish and wrap thoroughly with heavy duty foil.

 

Casserole-making is probably one of the most ancient forms of cooking, according to FoodTimeline.org. Back when sources for food were limited, the best way to get the most nutrients from food was to stick a bunch of ingredients together in a pot. By slowing cooking those ingredients in an earthenware container, the flavors blended well and tough foods (like game meat) softened. Today, casseroles continue as a workhorse in the kitchen, making delicious meals possible without a lot of work.

Basic Casserole Ingredients


Traditionally, casseroles include at least one each of: a vegetable, a protein (meat, poultry, fish, or beans), a starch (like potatoes, rice, or pasta), a sauce, and a topping. Knowing this basic recipe, anyone can create a casserole from leftovers. For example, if you had pork roast on Monday, you could make a casserole with left over pork roast (cut into bite-sized chunks) on Tuesday. You’d just need to add some vegetables and perhaps a little rice or pasta, along with a sauce and topping.

The Sauce

Every casserole needs a binder – something to bring all the ingredients together. Still using the leftover pork casserole as an example, you could place the juices left over from cooking the meat in a saucepan, add a little wine, water, or stock, if desired, and reduce on the stove. To thicken the sauce, you could add a tablespoon or two of cornstarch or flour. Or, instead of using the pork juice, you could use cream soup, gravy, or chees e sauce as a binder. For other types of casseroles, a mixture of eggs and ricotta cheese is a good choice.

Toppin gs

Most casseroles have some sort of starch topping, like thinly sliced potatoes, mashed potatoes, crackers, or bread crumbs. A mixture of cheeses sprinkled over the top of the casserole is also appropriate.

Putting it Together

Ingredients that take a while to cook through (like chunks of meat or large pieces of onion) are at least partially pre-cooked before putting them in the casserole. Once this is done, all the basic ingredients can go into a casserole dish. Whether you choose to mix the main ingredients together in the dish or layer them is a matter of personal preference. Add the sauce, then the topping, and bake in a 350 to 375 degree F. oven until the ingredients are heated through. If desired, casseroles are easy to freeze. Just line the casserole dish with heavy duty foil before adding the ingredients; allow the casserole to cool, then place it (still in the dish) in the freezer. Once the casserole is frozen, remove it from the dish and wrap thoroughly with heavy duty foil.

 

 

Overview of our healthy easy casserole recipes

Baked Chicken Noodle Casserole

Baked Chicken Noodle Casserole

Cabbage Gratin with Polenta

Cabbage Gratin with Polenta

Chicken Rice and Mushroom Casserole

Chicken Rice and Mushroom Casserole

Curried Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Curried Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Curried Green Bean and Mushroom Casserole

Curried Green Bean and Mushroom...

Green Tomato Casserole

Green Tomato Casserole

Romano Bean Casserole with Winter Squash and Mushrooms

Romano Bean Casserole with Winter...

Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Cheese Sauce

Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Cheese...

Our featured healthy easy casserole recipes

Baked Chicken Noodle Casserole

Baked Chicken Noodle Casserole

Cabbage Gratin with Polenta

Cabbage Gratin with Polenta

Chicken Rice and Mushroom Casserole

Chicken Rice and Mushroom Casserole

Curried Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Curried Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Curried Green Bean and Mushroom Casserole

Curried Green Bean and Mushroom Casserole

Green Tomato Casserole

Green Tomato Casserole

Romano Bean Casserole with Winter Squash and Mushrooms

Romano Bean Casserole with Winter Squash and...

Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Cheese Sauce

Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Cheese Sauce

Other healthy easy casserole recipes 

Add your listing here

Baked Chicken Noodle Casserole

This hearty casserole is also tasty and healthy as it is made with whole-wheat noodles, fat-free chicken broth, skim milk and low-fat cheese.

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Cabbage Gratin with Polenta

Seasonality: December-February (Winter) Location: Ottawa (Eastern Forest Region)   The sharp flavour of cabbage mellows when cooked in milk.

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Chicken Rice and Mushroom Casserole

Adapted from the Holiday Cookbook. Chicken, rice and mushrooms team up to make a hearty, tasty casserole.

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Curried Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

Adapted from the Holiday Cookbook. Give your traditional chicken and broccoli casserole more flavor by adding curry powder. Using low-fat and fat-free ingredients makes this dish healthy as well.

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Curried Green Bean and Mushroom Casserole

Mushroom and curry were definitely made for each other, and when you add green beans to the mix, you have the complimentary of the soft and smooth of mushrooms and cream, and the roughness of green beans. Truly appetizing and a...

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Green Tomato Casserole

Seasonality: September-October (Early Autumn) Location: Ottawa (Eastern Forest Region)   At the end of summer, many of us are left with unripened tomatoes on the vine and no idea what to do with them beyond putting them in a...

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Romano Bean Casserole with Winter Squash and...

Who would have thought that romano bean casserole with winter squash and mushrooms would taste amazing? This is a great recipe that vegetarians, vegans, and health buffs alike would have to try. It has all the wonderful...

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Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Cheese Sauce

Scalloped Potatoes with Ham and Cheese Sauce Served hot and bubbly, this dish makes a great meal on a cold day. Add a salad and Italian bread for sides.

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