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Salmon and wolf fish carpaccio with tender leaves

Video Filename (URL):
c41r01512K_Stream
Servings:
4
Preparation Time:
20 mn
Cooking Time:
20
Recommended Wine:
Auxey-Duresses Blanc
Ingredients:
7 oz. salmon, 7 oz. wolf fish, 20 basil leaves, 67 ½ oz. olive oil, 1 branch of chive, 1 branch of tarragon, juice from 3 lemon, salt, pepper
Preparation Instructions:
Slice the fish. In a dish, prepare the marinade with lemon juice, salt, pepper, and olive oil. Lay fish in marinade and allow it to sit for several minutes. Shred basil, chive, and tarragon. Arrange the herbs around the fish.
Restaurant Name:
Le Mahatma
Restaurant Id:
Chef Name:
Mario d'Orio
Chef Id:
47

Salmon and wolf fish carpaccio with tender leaves

There are two theories behind carpaccio, but they both begin with beef. The first and more widely-known speculation is that carpaccio was created at Harry’s Bar in Venice, Italy in 1950 when it was served to the countess Amalia Nani Mocenigo whose doctor prescribed that she only eat raw meat. At her request, Giuseppe Cipriani sliced pieces of raw beef very thinly and dressed them with creamy olive oil vinaigrette. The dish was named after the 15th century painter Vittore Carpaccio because the dish reminded Cipriani of his paintings.

 

A second story is born at Savini Restaurant in Milan with a woman who was again told only to eat raw meat (maybe it was the same lady!). The waiter suggested she call the raw meat carpaccio because it sounded more elegant then ordering raw meat. A Carpaccio painting was hanging in the restaurant at the time. No matter what the story, a delicious dish was born, but after the Italians created carpaccio, it was the French who perfected it. The French created duck carpaccio, vegetable carpaccio, and salmon and tuna carpaccios. Today, chefs are experimenting with all types of carpaccio.

 

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